Posted on February 3, 2017 by Rebekah Johnson

With flu activity reports showing a high level of ill­ness, the Wyoming Department of Health (WDH) is reminding residents of the common-sense steps they can take to avoid spreading influenza or be­coming ill with the disease.

“Reports have been showing high levels of activity across the state for the last few weeks. We don’t know whether we’ve yet reached the peak of activity,” said Clay Van Houten, interim state epidemiologist with WDH.

Influenza is a contagious, respiratory illness caused by a virus. Symptoms in­clude fever, headache, extreme tiredness, dry cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose and muscle aches.

“Influenza should not be overlooked as a serious threat.  Our public health la­boratory testing is showing that H3N2 is the flu strain circulating around the state and nation,” Van Houten said. “This is concerning because we tend to see more hospitalizations and deaths reported during seasons when this type of flu is dominant, especially among young children and older adults.”

Common-sense measures can help slow or prevent influenza’s spread. “Covering your mouth and nose with your sleeve or a tissue when you sneeze and cough; frequently washing your hands; and staying home from work, school, day care and errands when you are ill can help,” Van Houten said.

“Vaccines are the most important tool available to help prevent influenza and we know this season’s vaccine includes the strain circulating in Wyoming,” he said. Flu shots are still available in many locations; WDH recommends the vaccine annually for nearly everyone over the age of six months.

Van Houten reminded residents it takes about two weeks for flu vaccines to offer protection. “If you’re exposed to the virus in the meantime, you may still become ill,” he said.

Doctors may recommend prescription antiviral medications to help treat influ­enza.These medications may be especially helpful for persons at higher risk for flu complications such as young children, adults 65 andr older, persons with chronic medical conditions, persons with challenged immune systems, women who are pregnant or soon after delivery, persons less than 19 years of age who are on long-term aspirin therapy for other conditions, those who are extremely overweight, and residents of nursing homes or other chronic-care facilities.

“For antiviral medications to be a good option, it is important to seek medical care quickly once you start to become ill,” Van Houten advised.

Van Houten said residents who become ill should get lots of rest, drink plenty of liquids and avoid using alcohol or tobacco. “You may also take over-the-counter medications to relieve your symptoms, but should avoid giving prod­ucts containing aspirin to children or teens with flu-like symptoms,” he said.

Crisis Text Line Available in Wyoming – News from the Wyoming Department of Health

Posted on September 27, 2016 by Rebekah Johnson

A newly available statewide Crisis Text Line will provide anonymous, continuous crisis support to Wyoming residents who may be in crisis and at risk of suicide.

Promoted by the Wyoming Department of Health, Grace For 2 Brothers Foun­dation, and the Prevention Management Organization, Crisis Text Line ena­bles anyone with a mobile phone with SMS capability to access free support by texting WYO to 741-741.

“Many of our Wyoming neighbors who struggle sometimes with depression, bullying, substance abuse, relationship problems and suicidal thoughts feel they have no one to turn to,” said Rhianna Brand, director of operations for Grace For 2 Brothers Foundation, a Cheyenne-based nonprofit focused on sui­cide prevention.

Brand noted that text messages offer a discreet, familiar and accessible form of communication available to most people.

Mikki Munson, community prevention specialist with the Prevention Manage­ment Organization, said the text line’s trained specialists with extensive train­ing in crisis intervention provide emotional support to anyone in crisis, as well as safety planning and referrals.

“This partnership with the Crisis Text Line will connect someone in crisis to a counselor in their most critical time of need,” Munson said.  Munson also not­ed the anonymous data collected by the Crisis Text Line will help Wyoming work to improve prevention efforts and mental health resources.

By: Kim Deti